Salesman in the Spotlight

During the Indiana-Illinois Farm & Outdoor Power Show Glascock Equipment’s sales representative Rodney Smith was interviewed by Amie Sites with Indiana Agri News.  The Indiana Agri News has been publishing articles about careers in agriculture, and Rodney was picked for equipment sales.  Rodney spoke about the company, the perks of his job, and his goal of making sure the customer’s needs are met.  

~Carly Coon

 

Equipment salesman strives to help farmers thrive
Amie Sites, Field Editor
Thursday, December 31, 2015 5:00 PM

KINGSMAN, Ind. — Each day is a little different for Rodney Smith, a salesman with Glascock Equipment and Sales, but the ultimate goal is the same: Help farmers and other customers find equipment to make their work easier.
The Fountain County native always wanted to do something in agriculture. He grew up helping out on his family’s grain and livestock farm before he left to work in the steel industry.

After 12 years, Smith made a decision to do something that would allow him to spend more time with his family and help out on the farm.

Working in sales for Glascock Equipment was a natural fit.

“We deal with extremely good clientele and that makes it fun,” Smith said. “I like working with farmers, and I knew that this was something I would enjoy doing.”

He works with customers, selling hay equipment, livestock equipment, tillage equipment and more. Taking care of the customer is the most important aspect of the job, he said.

Although it is a different time in the industry with higher input costs and lower commodity prices, farmers still need equipment, Smith said.

“A lot of products we promote are actually products that save or make you money,” he said. “It’s a different scenario than it has been in the past, but there is still a lot of interest there.”

Glascock Equipment and Sales was started in 1976 by Loren and Janice Glascock. Something that makes the company stand out is the family feel, Smith said.

Another thing that makes the company special is that as a short-line dealer it picks and chooses what it wants to sell, he said.

“If we like something and we think it’s going to benefit people, we get it,” he said. “That’s our criteria on how we pick things.”

To prepare for the job, he learned as much as he could about the products he would be selling. He advises anyone thinking about a career in equipment sales to do the same.

“I firmly believe you need to know what you’re selling,” Smith said. “You have to understand it — that’s the biggest thing you can do.”

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